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Diversity Dialogue

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Part of the Current Clinical Psychiatry book series (CCPSY)

Abstract

Diversity Dialogue is a 3-hour diversity, equity, and inclusion training designed and deployed by the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Department of Psychiatry Center for Diversity. The authors of this chapter are members of the Diversity Dialogue training team, and the lead author is the director of the Diversity Dialogue program. Diversity Dialogue offers a way for staff members of all medical specialties to discuss cultural themes with each other, particularly those attendees have personally found most challenging. Participants agree to separate from other duties for 3 hours to allow time to focus on this exercise, giving each other full attention and respect, while personal vignettes of cultural themes are shared. This chapter highlights individual, often unconscious, internal processes, such as communication styles, privilege, racial identity development, assumption, bias, and microaggression that make dialogue about diversity so complex. It also addresses topics that are central to conducting cross-cultural dialogue sessions, including diversity training research, the concept of “otherness,” and the difference between conversation, debate, and dialogue. The chapter ends with a description of how to conduct a Diversity Dialogue.

Keywords

  • Cross-cultural communication
  • Diversity dialogue
  • Diversity training
  • Equity
  • Inclusion
  • Liberatory education
  • Microaggression
  • Otherness

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Correspondence to Anne Emmerich .

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Appendix: Post-Dialogue Evaluation Survey

Appendix: Post-Dialogue Evaluation Survey

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Emmerich, A., Otero, A., Parekh, R., Sharon, E. (2019). Diversity Dialogue. In: Parekh, R., Trinh, NH. (eds) The Massachusetts General Hospital Textbook on Diversity and Cultural Sensitivity in Mental Health. Current Clinical Psychiatry. Humana, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-20174-6_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-20174-6_1

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