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Not by Convention: Working with People on the Sexual and Gender Continuum

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Abstract

We chose the title of this chapter with clear intent. How many LGB, LGBT, and LGBTQ scholarly works have you read in the pursuit of understanding of how gender and sexuality develop through the lifecycle, affect physical and mental health and well-being, and impact social discourse, policy, and law? In January 2017, the National Geographic published a special issue entitled, “Gender Revolution,” highlighting how resilient our younger generations are in moving beyond traditional, dichotomous categories and living life on the gender and sexual continuum.

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Fig. 12.1

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Correspondence to Jeremy A. Wernick .

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Wernick, J.A., Busa, S.M., Janssen, A., Liaw, K.RL. (2019). Not by Convention: Working with People on the Sexual and Gender Continuum. In: Parekh, R., Trinh, NH. (eds) The Massachusetts General Hospital Textbook on Diversity and Cultural Sensitivity in Mental Health. Current Clinical Psychiatry. Humana, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-20174-6_12

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-20174-6_12

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