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Translational Challenges: Lymph Node Tissue Engineering

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Abstract

Chronic lymphedema is a progressive pathological condition of the lymphatic system often leading to a clinical picture of disfigurement and decreased mobility and function. The authors discuss clinical presentation with diagnosis and stages and traditional treatment.

Typically, a clinical history and physical examination are sufficient to provide a clear diagnosis of chronic lymphedema, but in obscure cases lymphoscintigraphy and/or magnetic resonance imaging will lead to a diagnosis. Most innovative regenerative medicine paradigms are related to cell processing and culturing, but combined autologous lymph node fragments and biodegradable scaffolds are particularly promising.

Keywords

  • Lymph node
  • Tissue engineering
  • Translational medicine
  • Lymphedema

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Fig. 25.1
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Correspondence to Philipp Neßbach .

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Neßbach, P., Aitzetmüller, M.M. (2019). Translational Challenges: Lymph Node Tissue Engineering. In: Duscher, D., Shiffman, M.A. (eds) Regenerative Medicine and Plastic Surgery. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-19958-6_25

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