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SkyWay in Zlín

Conference paper
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Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 984)

Abstract

Zlín is a city in the south-east of the Czech Republic. Like other cities, it has to deal with problems arising from population growth. One of these fields is Transport. Local public transport is currently, mainly provided for by trolleybuses, buses and trains in Zlín, and continues to be modernised. One of the public transportation possibilities for the future is the ability to quickly transport people inside the city - using the SkyWay technology. SkyWay is an elevated lightweight transport system, using a pre-loaded one-way rail with cables, (“threads”), and filled with a special concrete, between two or more buildings in an urban area. This paper describes work done at the Faculty of Applied Informatics, TBU in Zlín, representing a visualisation of the appearance of such a SkyWay in Zlín. This work encompasses the combination of real-time city footage of Zlín traffic - captured by camera; and the 3D SkyWay technology models that are imported into the recorded footage. All works were created in the Blender software suite. Its outputs are in the form of rendered images and animations.

Keywords

SkyWay 3D visualisation Rendering 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer and Communication Systems, Faculty of Applied InformaticsTomas Bata University in ZlínZlínCzech Republic

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