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Exploring the Rotational Onboarding Programs for Early-Career Engineers in Practice

Abstract

Background and purpose: Billions of dollars are spent helping new employees transition into the workforce every year. A type of onboarding process that is popular in the engineering practice is the rotational onboarding program where new engineering graduates spend time rotating through different departments within a company to gain knowledge of the departments and get acclimated to the company business. This practice is becoming increasingly popular as more than 50% of employers with more than 5000 employees have rotational onboarding training programs in the USA. Because studies on rotational onboarding programs in engineering practice are scarce, this paper aims to first explore current programs in the engineering sector by conducting a document analysis review of such programs to understand key factors and requirements for each program and also to understand the structure of the various companies and their business sector.

Design approach: A document analysis was used to explore 50 employer websites, job postings, job boards, and all documents available to explore rotational onboarding programs.

Results: The findings of this document analysis suggest that employers seek to invest in extensive developmental programs for engineering graduates that are academically above average, flexible, and open to expanding their technical knowledge, professional skills, and business acumen through their rotational onboarding programs.

Conclusions: The objectives and goals of rotational onboarding programs align with the student learning outcomes of accredited academic programs in engineering. A sensitivity to these types of programs is important to a deeper rigor in engineering education research in practice.

Keywords

  • Rotational onboarding
  • Early-career engineers
  • Onboarding
  • Engineering practice

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Fig. 6.1
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Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Dr. Michael Loui for his guidance and support during the development of this work. His dedication to the field of engineering education and the advancement of research in engineering practice is greatly appreciated.

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Correspondence to Bunmi Babajide .

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Babajide, B., Al Yagoub, H., Ohland, M.W. (2019). Exploring the Rotational Onboarding Programs for Early-Career Engineers in Practice. In: Abdulwahed, M., Bouras, A., Veillard, L. (eds) Industry Integrated Engineering and Computing Education. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-19139-9_6

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