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Land Use

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Part of the World Soils Book Series book series (WSBS)

Abstract

An important part of the structure of the agricultural lands of the country is the areas of arable land, and their multiyear dynamics is very important. The largest areas of arable land were registered in 1932. Since then, the reduction of the arable lands of Georgia had been an irreversible process, and in 1983, amounted to 53% of its maximum value. The sown area of winter wheat exceeded 200 thousand ha in all year. Starting from 1955, this area decreased permanently and by 1980, amounted twice as less as compared to 1927–1955. In 1913–1955, the sown corn areas amounted to 350–400 thousand ha. Since 1955, the sown corn areas drastically reduced year after year (3.5 times less the same index of 1945). Potato with its sown areas varying from 3.4 to 16.8 thousand ha in 1921–1937. Starting from 1937, the areas of potato increased year after year and reached its maximum in 1980.

Keywords

Arable land Sown area Wheat production Potato production 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Hydrometeorology, Agrometeorological DivisionNational Environmental AgencyTbilisiGeorgia

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