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The Impact of the Rise of Using Solar Energy in GCC Countries

Part of the Innovative Renewable Energy book series (INREE)

Abstract

The research and the prototype projects in the GCC countries were in place since 1970s which first were started in Kuwait, followed by Saudi Arabia in the 1980s, United Arab Emirates in the 1990s, and Bahrain, Oman and Qatar in twenty-first centuries. Now all GCC countries had conducted a relatively large project in Solar and Wind Energy, especially Kuwait (currently about 70 MW among a plan of 2000 MW by 2030), UAE (currently about 300 MW among a plan of 2500 MW by 2030) and Saudi Arabia (with an ambitious renewable energy target of 3450 GW by 2020 with a further 6000 GW envisioned by 2023 and to 200,000 MW by 2030). Such an acceleration in the use of solar and wind energy would have an impact. Major impacts are: (1) Major reduction in the solar electricity prices in the region. (2) More investors in renewable energy business. (3) Rise of innovative design of houses to utilize its structure in installation and integration of renewable energy devices. (4) Rise of many service and maintenance of solar technology companies. (5) Establishment of new academic programs and courses in solar and other Renewable Energy technologies in the higher education institute and technical organizations. (6) More concern and studies on disturbances to the main grid due to solar connection. (7) Major reduction in Carbon footprint per capita in GCC countries. (8) Use of more efficient and low consumption household and industrial devices. (9) Boost in battery industry for solar electricity storage.

Keywords

  • GCC countries
  • Carbon foot
  • Dust
  • Kyoto protocol

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Alnaser, W.E., Alnaser, N.W. (2020). The Impact of the Rise of Using Solar Energy in GCC Countries. In: Sayigh, A. (eds) Renewable Energy and Sustainable Buildings. Innovative Renewable Energy. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-18488-9_13

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-18488-9_13

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