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How Might Schooling Be Transformed to Contribute to Peace?

  • Clive HarberEmail author
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Abstract

This chapter examines in turn the different ways in which schooling might be transformed to contribute to peacebuilding in a post-conflict, developing society. It starts with school organisation, governance and management and discusses school segregation and desegregation, educational decentralisation, the nature of a democratic school and classroom, a human rights approach to schooling and UNICEF Child Friendly Schools. After a brief general introduction, the section on curriculum begins with a substantial discussion of peace education, its nature and purposes and evidence of support for it among international agencies. The discussion of peace education also involves a consideration of some of the key issues and problems facing peace education both in terms of its nature and the practical and institutional obstacles it faces in schools. The section on curriculum continues with a discussion of the nature of citizenship education and support for it as a mechanism of peacebuilding by the UN. There is also a brief discussion of human rights education. The section on curriculum finally looks at history and religious education as potentially contributing to peace and how they might do so. As it is not a central focus of the book, there is a brief reference to the language of instruction before the chapter discussed how teaching methods would need to be transformed in a more Freirean direction in schools and classrooms that contributed to peace.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK

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