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Tissue and Circulating Biomarkers in Mesothelioma

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Mesothelioma
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Abstract

Malignant pleural mesothelioma is mostly diagnosed at an advanced stage when it is untreatable with the available therapeutic strategies. Tumor biomarkers can play an important role not only in the screening (for the early detection of disease), diagnosis, and prognosis, but also in the predictive and monitoring treatment response.

It is possible to categorize the diagnostic biomarkers as tissue biomarkers, such as the BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP-1) and the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) gene, and soluble biomarkers, such as mesothelin and fibulin-3.

Unfortunately, the available tissue and serological diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers are in general characterized by relatively poor sensitivity and specificity, limiting their use in clinical practice.

Recently, a list of new biomarkers, including signature based on microRNA and messenger RNA expression, DNA, molecular panels and classification algorithms, and antibody targets, are being proposed for malignant mesothelioma with promising results.

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Zucali, P.A. (2019). Tissue and Circulating Biomarkers in Mesothelioma. In: Ceresoli, G., Bombardieri, E., D'Incalci, M. (eds) Mesothelioma. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-16884-1_8

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