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Introduction

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Abstract

This chapter stresses the importance of having a search pattern when looking at an image, the need for comparison with old studies and reports, and the value of symmetry, as well as the goal of treating dictations as conversations with the referring physicians.

Keywords

  • Chest radiology
  • Residents
  • Radiographs
  • Chest imaging scans

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Fig. e1.1

Value of asymmetry and old studies. Subtle pneumonia. (a) Area of asymmetric opacification in the right mid-zone (arrow) (TIF 6807 kb)

Fig. e1.1

Value of asymmetry and old studies. (b) On the prior normal study, this area was completely clear, and there has been a definite change (TIF 2920 kb)

Fig. e1.2

Atelectasis versus pneumonia. Axial CT image shows that the degree of enhancement can differentiate between atelectasis and pneumonia. On the right, there is little enhancement compared to the dorsal muscles (white arrow), consistent with pneumonia. On the left, there is substantial contrast enhancement (black arrow), indicative of atelectasis (TIF 671 kb)

Fig. e1.3

Pleural effusion. Axial CT image shows a large amount of material of uniform fluid attenuation filling much of the right hemithorax (white ∗). The area of increased attenuation (black ∗) “floating” on the fluid represents collapsed lung (TIF 593 kb)

Fig. e1.4

Effect of patient position on pleural effusions. (a) In the supine position, there is substantial opacification at the bases (arrows) with obscuration of the hemidiaphragms (arrows) (TIF 1330 kb)

Fig. e1.4

Effect of patient position on pleural effusions. (b) Repeat study a few minutes later with the patient upright shows a dramatic decrease in the appearance of the bilateral pleural effusions (TIF 1344 kb)

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Eisenberg, R.L. (2020). Introduction. In: What Radiology Residents Need to Know: Chest Radiology . Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-16826-1_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-16826-1_1

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-16825-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-16826-1

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