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Aorta

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Abstract

This chapter describes the spectrum of imaging appearances of acute aortic injury, aortic aneurysm and dissection, and pseudoaneurysm and coarctation of the aorta.

Keywords

  • Acute aortic injury
  • Aortic aneurysm
  • Aortic dissection
  • Pseudoaneurysm of the aorta
  • Coarctation of the aorta

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Reference

  1. Eisenberg RL. Clinical Imaging: An Atlas of Differential Diagnosis. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2010.

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Fig. e18.1

Aortic rupture with active hemorrhage. (a) Gross disruption of the proximal descending aorta with periaortic hematoma. Note the large hemothorax (TIF 632 kb)

Fig. e18.1

Aortic rupture with active hemorrhage. (b) More caudal scan shows active bleeding with contrast extravasation into the left pleural space (arrows) [1] (TIF 687 kb)

Fig. e18.2

Dissection of the ascending aorta (Stanford type A). Double-barrel aorta with intimal flap (arrow) separating the true and false lumens. (James Heilman, MD / Wikimedia) (TIF 699 kb)

Fig. e18.3

Dissection of both the ascending and descending aorta (Stanford type A). In addition to the double-barrel appearance with an intimal flap separating the true and false lumen in both areas (arrows), the traumatic event has resulted on a hemopericardium. (James Heilman, MD/Wikimedia) (TIF 557 kb)

Fig. e18.4

(a) Dissection of the descending aorta (Stanford type B). Double-barrel aorta with intimal flap separating the true and false lumen (arrow). (Wikimedia) (TIF 636 kb)

Fig. e18.4

(b) Dissection of the descending aorta (Stanford type B). Double-barrel aorta with intimal flap separating the true and false lumen (arrow). (Wikimedia) (TIF 522 kb)

Fig. e18.5

(a) Separation between intimal calcification (black arrow) and the outer border of the aortic shadow (white arrow). (Courtesy of Karen Lee, MD, Boston, MA) (TIF 3467 kb)

Fig. e18.5

(b) Coronal CT confirms widening of the aortic wall and displacement of the trachea to the right. (Courtesy of Karen Lee, MD, Boston, MA) (TIF 859 kb)

Fig. e18.6

Entry and reentry tears of aortic dissection. (a) Unlike the continuous intimal flap in the lower descending thoracic aorta, the intimal flap in the markedly dilated ascending aorta (arrow) is interrupted, indicating the entry point of the dissection. (Courtesy of Diana Litmanovich, MD, Boston) (TIF 822 kb)

Fig. e18.6

Entry and reentry tears of aortic dissection. (b) At a lower level, there is another incomplete intimal flap, indicating the reentry point of the dissection (arrow). (Courtesy of Diana Litmanovich, MD, Boston) (TIF 814 kb)

Fig. e18.7

Crescent sign of aneurysm rupture. On this non-contrast CT image, there is high attenuation of the aortic wall (arrow). (Courtesy of Diana Litmanovich, MD, Boston) (TIF 766 kb)

Fig. e18.8

Contrast CT scan of a ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm. Black arrow points to the aorta. White arrow points to blood in the thorax. (James Heilman, MD/Wikimedia) (TIF 735 kb)

Fig. e18.9

Coarctation of the aorta. The arrow points to the center of the reverse-3 sign [1] (TIF 772 kb)

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Eisenberg, R.L. (2020). Aorta. In: What Radiology Residents Need to Know: Chest Radiology . Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-16826-1_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-16826-1_18

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-16825-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-16826-1

  • eBook Packages: MedicineMedicine (R0)