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Emphysema

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Abstract

This chapter describes the major types of emphysema (centrilobular, panlobular, paraseptal) and their imaging appearances, bullous disease, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, and congenital lobar emphysema.

Keywords

  • Centrilobular emphysema
  • Panlobular emphysema
  • Paraseptal emphysema
  • Bullous disease
  • Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency
  • Congenital lobar emphysema

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-16826-1_12
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Fig. 12.4

References

  1. Nemec SF, Bankier AA, Eisenberg RL. Upper lobe-predominant diseases of the lung. AJR. 2013;200:W222–37.

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  2. Eisenberg RL, Johnson NM. Comprehensive Radiographic Pathology. 6th ed. St. Louis: Elsevier/Mosby; 2016.

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  3. Cantin L, Bankier AA, Eisenberg RL. Multiple cystlike lung lesions in the adult. AJR. 2010;194:W1–W11.

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Fig. e12.1

Giant emphysematous bulla. Air-containing mass (arrow) fills most of the left hemithorax [2] (TIF 729 kb)

Fig. e12.2

Emphysema. Upper lobe-predominant lucencies (arrows) with no visible wall, caused by destruction of lung parenchyma [3] (TIF 2732 kb)

Fig. e12.3

Emphysema (ankylosing spondylitis). Apical fibrobullous disease that includes subpleural fibrosis (solid arrow) as well as bullous changes (open arrow) [1] (TIF 2129 kb)

Fig. e12.4

End-stage emphysema. Huge bullae have effectively replaced the upper lungs bilaterally, especially on the left. Irregular soft-tissue mass in the left mid lung laterally (arrow) was a bronchogenic carcinoma, which represents another complication of heavy smoking. (Heilman/Wikimedia) (TIF 813 kb)

Fig. e12.5

Bulla. (a) Large gas-filled space in the anterobasilar portion of the right lung (TIF 649 kb)

Fig. e12.5

Bulla. (b) Large gas-filled space in the anterobasilar portion of the right lung (TIF 839 kb)

Fig. e12.6

Multiple bullae predominantly involve the upper lobe (arrow) [3] (TIF 1989 kb)

Fig. e12.7

Infected bullae. Coned chest radiograph shows multiple infected cystic structures with air-fluid levels (arrows) [3] (TIF 2193 kb)

Fig. e12.8

Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. (a) Panlobular emphysema that predominantly involves the lower lobes (TIF 3813 kb)

Fig. e12.8

Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. (b) Panlobular emphysema that predominantly involves the lower lobes (TIF 906 kb)

Fig. e12.9

Congenital lobar emphysema in an adult. Hyperlucency and overinflation of the left upper lobe (arrow) (TIF 2114 kb)

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Eisenberg, R.L. (2020). Emphysema. In: What Radiology Residents Need to Know: Chest Radiology . Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-16826-1_12

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-16826-1_12

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-16825-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-16826-1

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