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Introduction: Peons, Sopirs and Translanguagers

  • Glenn Toh
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter highlights ingrown and ingrained practices in English teaching, carried out (on) in notably self-referential and self-perpetuating ways that speak (reek) of their very own particularity. It also addresses the question of language being increasingly scrutinized for its largely non-preexistent, non-autonomous nature and the possibility that meaning making can be more diversely achieved through a mixture of codes, registers, genres and modalities. Narrower essentialist understandings of English teaching, in contrast, fall haplessly within the governing parameters of standardized grammars and generic conventions. The case of a Japanese university where the late introduction of a lingua franca informed English curriculum meets with unexpected and unforeseen difficulties is discussed, as the new curriculum is tested against the groove and grain of conventionalized and habituated teacher practices.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glenn Toh
    • 1
  1. 1.Language and Communication CentreNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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