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Brain Art pp 327–354Cite as

Advancing the Rehabilitative and Therapeutic Potential of BCI and Noninvasive Sensing Systems

Abstract

Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technologies have the capacity to go beyond serving as a basic communication medium for the motor-impaired, as they can also extend creative expression for application within therapeutic processes. By examining the ways in which BCI technologies can mediate communication, provide a venue for embodied interaction, and act as a medium for sharing both individual and collective experiences through the creative process, more can be understood about the ways these technologies can advance and improve the user-system interactions that occur within both digital and physical spaces. This study articulates the differences between neurofeedback and biofeedback, and explores a proof of concept application of both types of interventions. In doing so, it explores conceptual frameworks from a transdisciplinary approach, and demonstrates the potential new interface design strategies have for enabling original forms of creative expression through technology. It also examines the potential of noninvasive tools for expanding boundaries of digital spaces to offer more inclusive means for self-expression and identity formation for users. Using newly designed TCRE electrodes, these efforts explore how more precise scalp recordings may help uncover new methods for discovering patterns of brain activity while engaged with artistic creation for therapeutic processes.

Keywords

  • Tripolar EEG
  • Biofeedback
  • Neuroadaptive applications
  • Art therapy
  • Digital communication

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Fig. 12.1
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Notes

  1. 1.

    actiCAP Xpress Twist, Brain Products Available at: https://pressrelease.brainproducts.com/twist/.

  2. 2.

    LiveAmp compact wireless amplifier, Brain Products Available at: https://www.brainproducts.com/productdetails.php?id=63&tab=1.

  3. 3.

    Data received by LabStreamingLayer inlet available at: https://github.com/sccn/labstreaminglayer.

  4. 4.

    Python Software Foundation. Python Language Reference, version 2.7. Available at http://www.python.org.

  5. 5.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electroencephalography.

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Scott, S.M., Raftery, C., Anderson, C. (2019). Advancing the Rehabilitative and Therapeutic Potential of BCI and Noninvasive Sensing Systems. In: Nijholt, A. (eds) Brain Art. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-14323-7_12

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