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Cavity Flow of a Micropolar Fluid - a Parameter Study

  • Wilhelm RickertEmail author
  • Sebastian Glane
Chapter
Part of the Advanced Structured Materials book series (STRUCTMAT, volume 108)

Abstract

This paper presents a parameter study of the flow of a micropolar fluid. The underlying equations and the choice of boundary conditions are discussed. Two flow situations are considered: Couette flow as a reference problem and the liddriven cavity problem. The governing equations are specialized for the case of twodimensional flow and discussed in dimensionless form. Several dimensionless parameters common in the theory of micropolar fluids are identified and their impact on the solutions is analyzed using the finite element method.

Keywords

Micropolar fluid theory Microstructured material Lid-driven cavity problem Forced convection 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of MechanicsTechnische Universität BerlinBerlinGermany

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