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Constructing and Critiquing Interracial Couples on YouTube

  • Francesca SobandeEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Over the last decade, interracial couples and families are increasingly depicted in media and marketing. They are a strong source of public discourse, including discussion about British royalty and race relations. As the number of interracial couples and mixed-race individuals rises, it is pertinent to understand their representation in changing media and marketplace contexts. The online video-sharing site YouTube hosts related digital content warranting further study. In particular, the phenomenon of YouTube video blogging (vlogging) enables documentation of the lives of various interracial couples. As such, this chapter analyzes the activities of high-profile interracial couple video bloggers (vloggers). It explores how and why interracial couple vlogs are connected to issues regarding race, gender, sexuality, and the contemporary marketplace.

Keywords

Couple Digital Family Internet Interracial Intersectionality Media Online Vlogger YouTube 

Further reading

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  4. Sobande, F. (2017). Watching me watching you: Black women in Britain on YouTube. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 20(6), 655–671.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cardiff UniversityCardiffUK

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