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Literature Review

  • Lixun Wang
  • Andy Kirkpatrick
Chapter
Part of the Multilingual Education book series (MULT, volume 33)

Abstract

This chapter contains a literature review of multilingual education and how it is being implemented in a selection of countries. The chapter then narrows the review down to multilingual education in Southeast Asia, with a particular focus on the countries of the Association of southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The chapter also provides a brief review of multilingual education in selected European Contexts and considers some of the challenges faced by those who wish to introduce multilingual education. The chapter then turns to a review of code-mixing, code-switching and translanguaging and critically discusses the research into code-mixing and code-switching in Hong Kong.

A more detailed review of language policies in Hong Kong is then provided, where we point out, in concluding the chapter, that schools have been given the freedom to develop their own ways of implementing trilingual education.

Keywords

Multilingual education ASEAN Europe Language education policy Code-mixing Code-switching Translanguaging 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lixun Wang
    • 1
  • Andy Kirkpatrick
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Linguistics and Modern Language StudiesThe Education University of Hong KongTai PoHong Kong
  2. 2.Department of Languages & LinguisticsGriffith UniversityNathanAustralia

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