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Exploring Surgeon’s Acceptance of Virtual Reality Headset for Training

Part of the Progress in IS book series (PROIS)

Abstract

Understanding user intention to accept or reject a new technology is a key factor in implementation and success of new system technology in an organization (Gahtani & King, 1999). The purpose of this study was to explore surgeon’s acceptance of Virtual Reality Headset (VRH) as a surgical simulator. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model was applied to explore the factors that affected surgeon’s acceptance. A structured questionnaire was conducted to capture information from international surgeons. The result explain 52% of variance associated with Behavioural Intention (R2 = 0.521), the three constructs of UTAUT model: Performance Expectancy (PE), Social Influence (SI) and Effort Expectancy (EE) have a significance and the biggest impact on surgeons behavioural intention to use the Virtual Reality Headset, therefore organizations must take into account the following: (1) emphasize the usefulness of the software (2) consider surgeon’s psychological aspects. (3) The system must be easy to use.

Keywords

  • Virtual reality headset
  • Simulator
  • Surgical training
  • UTAUT
  • Technology acceptance

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Acknowledgements

The author would first like to thank and express her sincere appreciation to her supervisor Prof. Dr. Thomas Crispeels at the VUB university, to Mr. David Badri and Johnson and Johnson for the financial support and the opportunity to run this study and meet surgeons from all over the world.

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Correspondence to Libi Beke Hen .

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Beke Hen, L. (2019). Exploring Surgeon’s Acceptance of Virtual Reality Headset for Training. In: tom Dieck, M., Jung, T. (eds) Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality. Progress in IS. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06246-0_21

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