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Trinidad and Tobago: Shifting Times, Shifting Governments, and Shifting Inclusion

  • Kristina HindsEmail author
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Part of the Non-Governmental Public Action book series (NGPA)

Abstract

Like the previous chapter, this chapter supplies an in-depth discussion of the spaces available for civil society and CSOs in governance. This time the focus is on the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. This chapter notes that Trinidad and Tobago has not been able to sustain a specific mechanism for CSO participation in governance, but that there have been several initiatives aimed at creating such over time. The chapter also provides an assessment of official language found in development planning documents which indicates state openness to creating collaborative relationships with stakeholders. This willingness to collaborate with CSOs that is expressed in development planning documents bears similarities to the case of Barbados. This chapter also notes some of the legislative arrangements that make it easier for citizens to access public information in the country and notes this as a useful step towards facilitating participation in governance.

Keywords

Trinidad and Tobago Civil society Civil society organisations Governance Development planning Freedom of information Stakeholders 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of the West IndiesBridgetownBarbados

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