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REBT and Addictions

Abstract

As REBT has always been a truly integrative approach, it is especially well suited for the treatment of addictions . Addictions develop over time, often inadvertently and accidently. No one sets out to be come addicted. But once in place, addictive behaviours are usually (but not always) very difficult to change, probably because of a combination of genetic predispositions and brain “re -wiring.” An approach that integrates cognitive, emotive and behavioural techniques, and a non-judgemental, empathic therapeutic working relationship , appears to have the most research support as being effective.

Keywords

  • REBT
  • Addictions
  • Alcohol misuse
  • Substance abuse
  • CBT
  • Transdiagnostic
  • Evidence-based
  • Motivational interviewing
  • SMART recovery
  • Integrative

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Correspondence to F. Michler Bishop .

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Michler Bishop, F. (2019). REBT and Addictions. In: Dryden, W., Bernard, M. (eds) REBT with Diverse Client Problems and Populations. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-02723-0_6

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