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Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Africa: Strategies, Synergies, and Constraints

Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Abstract

This chapter uses data on Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) to examine the nature of climate change mitigation and adaptation actions being pursued in African countries and assesses the extent to which preferred mitigation and adaptation priorities advance the cause of sustainable development on the continent. The prospective synergies between mitigation and adaptation approaches and sustainable development are assessed. Also, the pathways through which resource constraints and institutional and policy environment affect Africa’s ability to mitigate and adapt to climate change are examined, as well as the degree to which these constraints are being addressed. It is argued that Africa’s ability to benefit from sustainable development synergies embedded in the mitigation and adaptation strategies in the INDCs will be greatly limited by institutional and policy environment that hinders funding, capacity building, and technological innovation systems development. The slow pace of efforts to address these impediments further erodes confidence that climate adaptation in Africa will be effective at sufficiently contributing to a reduction in climate change risks to the continent.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Data based on dominant themes in INDCs. Extracting exact details from INDCs is complicated by the fact that there are no universal guidelines for designing and formatting them. Each country submits an INDC according to its understanding of the request from the UNFCCC.

  2. 2.

    These percentages are extracted from the INDCs of the respective countries, as listed in the World Bank Database (as of July 6, 2017, http://spappssecext.worldbank.org/sites/indc/Pages/Adaptation.aspx).

  3. 3.

    See Pepermans et al. (2005), Jordehi (2016), and El-Khattam and Salama (2004) for extended definitions and analysis of the types of distributed generation and their associated benefits.

  4. 4.

    See Nyiwul (2016) for a detailed critique of environmental regulation in African countries.

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Correspondence to Linus M. Nyiwul .

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Appendix

Appendix

Fig. 3
Five graphs depict the mitigation priorities in Africa. Three spider web graphs depict forestry, renewable energy, and waste details. Two pie charts depict agriculture and transport details in percentage.

Mitigation priorities in Africa

Fig. 4
Seven graphs depict adaptation priorities. Two spider web charts depict agriculture and health details. Three pie charts, energy, forestry, and water details in percentage. Two bar graphs, urban and disaster risk management details.

Adaptation priorities

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Nyiwul, L.M. (2019). Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Africa: Strategies, Synergies, and Constraints. In: Sequeira, T., Reis, L. (eds) Climate Change and Global Development. Contributions to Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-02662-2_11

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