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Cross-Modal and Cognitive Processes in Sound Localization

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The Technology of Binaural Understanding

Abstract

To perceptually situate a sound source in the context of its surrounding environment, a listener must integrate two spatial estimates, (1), the location, relative to the listener’s head, of the auditory event associated with the sound-source and, (2), the location of the listener’s head relative to the environment. This chapter introduces the general background of auditory localization as a multi-sensory process and reviews studies of cross-modal interactions with auditory localization for stationary/moving sound sources and listeners. Included are relevant results from recent experiments at Arizona State University’s Spatial-Hearing and Auditory Computation and Neurophysiology Laboratories. Finally, a conceptual model of the integrated multisensory/multi-system processes is described.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Kemar®is an often-used head-and-torso simulator—a so-called “dummy head”.

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Acknowledgements

The work reported here is supported by the National Science Foundation (No. NSF BCS-1539376), the National Institute for Deafness and Communication Disorders (Nos. R0101DC015214 and F32DC017676), and Facebook Reality Labs. The authors are indebted to two anonymous reviewers for constructive comments and suggestions.

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Correspondence to M. Torben Pastore .

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Pastore, M.T., Zhou, Y., Yost, W.A. (2020). Cross-Modal and Cognitive Processes in Sound Localization. In: Blauert, J., Braasch, J. (eds) The Technology of Binaural Understanding. Modern Acoustics and Signal Processing. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-00386-9_12

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