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Abstract

Weather forecasting, as defined in Huschke (1959, p. 623), is a statement of the expected future occurrence of one or more weather elements. Weather elements are taken to include such things as “temperature, humidity, precipitation, cloudiness, brightness, visibility, and wind.” Thus, weather forecasting is not just forecasting the variables in the governing equations of meteorology. Inferring the patterns of weather elements from a map depicting those variables is also essential (Tepper, 1959; Sanders, 1971; Weiss and Ferguson, 1982), even with high-resolution data (Tepper, 1959).

Keywords

Weather Forecast Linear Extrapolation Severe Weather Outflow Boundary American Meteorological Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Meteorological Society 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. A. DoswellIII

There are no affiliations available

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