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Severe Local Storms Forecasting

  • Alan R. Moller
Part of the Meteorological Monographs book series (METEOR)

Abstract

Atmospheric hazards are the deadliest of all natural disasters in the United States (White and Haas 1975; Petak and Atkisson 1982). Local convective storm-induced severe weather and floods result in approximately 400 fatalities annually, with excessive heat and cold accounting for about 600 deaths and hurricanes for more than 30 fatalities each year (Riebsame et al. 1986). Convective storm mortality rates have stabilized, or even decreased, in the United States and other industrialized countries, but they have generally increased in developing nations.

Keywords

Vertical Wind Shear Severe Weather Severe Storm Squall Line Convective Storm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Meteorological Society 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan R. Moller
    • 1
  1. 1.National Weather ServiceFort WorthUSA

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