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Introduction

Abstract

The term glaucoma encompasses a number of diseases in which there is a progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) with corresponding visual field loss that results in a characteristic “cupped” appearance in the optic nerve head. Glaucoma results in an irreversible loss of visual field, usually starting in the periphery, and sometimes affecting the central visual field first, but leading to varying degrees of visual disability and, in a small but significant proportion of patients, blindness.

Keywords

  • Visual Field Defect
  • Trabecular Meshwork
  • Angle Closure
  • Visual Field Loss
  • Retinal Ganglion Cell

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Barton, K., Hitchings, R.A. (2013). Introduction. In: Budenz, D. (eds) Medical Management of Glaucoma. Springer Healthcare, Tarporley. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-907673-44-3_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-907673-44-3_1

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