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Opportunities and Challenges for Augmented Environments: A Distributed Cognition Perspective

Part of the Computer Supported Cooperative Work book series (CSCW)

Abstract

Currently a new generation of inexpensive digital recording devices and storage facilities is revolutionizing data collection in behavioral science, extending it into situations that have not been typically accessible and enabling the examination of the fine details of action captured in meaningful settings. The ability to record and share such data has not only created a critical moment in the practice and scope of behavioral research but also presents unprecedented opportunities and challenges for the design of future augmented environments. In this chapter, we discuss these challenges and argue that fully capitalizing on the associated opportunities requires theoretical and methodological frameworks to effectively analyze data that capture the richness of real-world human activity. We sample five recent research projects from our laboratory chosen to exemplify a distributed cognition perspective and highlight opportunities and challenges relevant to the design and evaluation of augmented environments.

Keywords

  • Deaf Community
  • Digital Document
  • Deaf Participant
  • Commercial Aviation
  • Digital Table

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to James D. Hollan .

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Hollan, J.D., Hutchins, E.L. (2009). Opportunities and Challenges for Augmented Environments: A Distributed Cognition Perspective. In: Lahlou, S. (eds) Designing User Friendly Augmented Work Environments. Computer Supported Cooperative Work. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-098-8_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-098-8_9

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