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Co-design Approaches for Early Phases of Augmented Environments

Part of the Computer Supported Cooperative Work book series (CSCW)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the early phases in the development processes of new product-service systems and particularly on the possibility of actively involving users in view of generating a concept. It describes the main hurdles to both the project team and user research and suggests methodological approaches devised by the author.

In particular the chapter describes two tools called: “Scenario co-design” and “Spot Experiment,” respectively, featuring examples of how these tools can be used in the field of augmented environments.

Keywords

  • Project Team
  • Collective Memory
  • Friendly User
  • User Research
  • Fluid Creativity

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The series of clips “Vision of the Future” (Marzano 1996) produced by Philips Design is a good example of these communication oriented scenario visions.

  2. 2.

    M.U.S. Multiservice Urban Space/Visualisation-in-progress, Industrial Design workshop hold by F. Jégou, Politecnico di Milano, 12–16 May 2001.

  3. 3.

    LDC-EDF/DALT, Digital Bridge social scenario, Paris 2000.

  4. 4.

    It is to be noted that a certain antagonism exists in term of visualization between facilitating the projection of users into a scenario and giving them access to the modification of the same scenario: in order to make users “feel” the proposed environment and somewhat experience it, the related visualization must be quite elaborate and convincing. Such visualization generally requires professional skill to be produced and, consequently, is not easily changeable by the users.

  5. 5.

    Interaction room project, EDF headquarters, Paris Wagram, 2001.

  6. 6.

    Strategic Design Scenarios and Égérie Research, “Sustainable Everyday, Scenarios of urban life” exhibition preparation work, Brussels, 2002.

  7. 7.

     This setting is based on the so-called “Wizard of Oz” trick: a member of the design team, hidden, pretends to be the future provider of the system and answers accordingly to the user concerns. The user believes that he/she can interact with the system.

  8. 8.

    It is to be noted that a co-design session differs in its aim form a user research evaluation. The purpose is not to assess a determinate scenario but to make it evolve. Therefore the visual material presented to the four successive users is not the same. Thanks to the flexibility of the Animated Story-Board technique, it is adapted by the project team between each session and the following user benefits from previous user interaction.

  9. 9.

    It is to be noted that this dimension corresponds in macro-scenario approach to the two opposite attitudes of back-casting and fore-casting: either the scenario is proposed as a goal to be obtained (and the project team works on understanding what the changes to be implemented are in order to lead to this future situation) or the scenario is proposed as a result to be investigated (and the project team works on an exploration of the potential consequences of the changes implemented).

  10. 10.

    VideoSketching creative session animated by F. Jégou, “Social business Innovation” workshop coordinated by S. Maschi, Interaction Design Institute Ivrea, January 2003.

  11. 11.

    Videostreaming ClipScape, LDC-EDF/DALT, Paris, 2001.

  12. 12.

    “Sustainable Everyday, Scenarios of urban life” exhibition, F. Jégou, E. Manzini and A. Nandi. Parc d’Aventures Scientifiques et Sociales, Framerie (Belgium) 2004.

  13. 13.

    Ambiant Agoras, Dynamic Information Clouds in a Hybrid World, Disappearing Computers.

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Correspondence to François Jégou .

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Jégou, F. (2009). Co-design Approaches for Early Phases of Augmented Environments. In: Lahlou, S. (eds) Designing User Friendly Augmented Work Environments. Computer Supported Cooperative Work. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-098-8_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-098-8_6

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