Abstract

No matter how good and reliable the techniques and methods are for defining, recognizing and detection of MIC, all will become pointless if the problem can not be cured. Treatment programs can be divided in two, either to mitigate an existing problem or to prevent the initiation of a problem, right from the beginning. In reality, most of the time what is required is mitigation. There are very innovative ways to deal with a biocorrosion problem. In addition, in nature there are mechanisms from which many industrial biocidal treatments have been imitated. All the above examples can serve to show that the treatment of microbiologically-influenced corrosion cases may not always be taken as expensive or environmentally unfriendly practices. With lateral thinking and multidimensional planning based on understanding of the mechanisms of microbial corrosion, it is possible to make a change, when necessary. Treatment of MIC can be done, with the present knowledge, in four categories, physical-mechanical, chemical, electrochemical and biological. While all of these tech-niques have been refined and advanced with respect to just a couple of years ago, some of them are quite new. An important part of this chapter focuses on cathodic protection and its effect(s) on MIC, helping the reader acknowledge that in the field of MIC there is hardly anything that has not been, or is not currently, under challenge. This will once again justify the vital need for more research and more communication among different disciplines of science and engineering with each other and with the industry.

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