Great Libraries in the Service of Science

  • Alan Eyre

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References

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    Joseph Needham. Science and Civilization in China. 27 vols. Cambridge: University Press, 1954. There is a handy one-volume ‘‘distillation’’ by Robert Temple, with an introduction by Needham: China, land of discovery. Wellingborough: Patrick Stephens, 1986.Google Scholar
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    Originally and until fairly recently known as the Library of the British Museum.Google Scholar

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© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2008

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  • Alan Eyre

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