Abstract

This chapter presents the history, natural occurrence, most common minerals and ores, extraction processes, industrial preparation, applications and uses, and the major physical and chemical properties of the common nonferrous metals, namely: aluminum (Al), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and tin (Sn) and their alloys. Several tables containing comprehensive lists of the properties of a selection of the most common commercial alloys are also included.

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Further Reading

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