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Abstract

This chapter presents the definitions and properties of liquids, including inorganic and organic solvents, commercial aqueous solutions of acids and bases, molten salts, liquid metals, heat transfer fluids, and heavy liquids. A table containing a comprehensive list of the properties of more than 200 liquids is also included.

Keywords

None None Ketone Methyl Acrylate Ethyl Ethyl Mercaptan Dimethyl Adipate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Adamson, P.W. (1990) Physical Chemistry of Surfaces. (5 th. ed.) John Wiley & Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Bikerman, J.J. (1958) Surface Chemistry. Theory and Applications. Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Evans, D.F.; Wennerstrom, H. (1994) The Colloidal Domain where Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Technology Meet. VCH Publications.Google Scholar
  4. Harkins, W.D. (1952) The Physical Chemistry of Surface Films. Reinhold Publishing Corp., New YorkGoogle Scholar
  5. Hunter, R. (1986) Foundations of Colloid Science. Oxford Science Publications, Oxford.Google Scholar
  6. Israelachivilli, J.N. (1992) Intermolecular and Surface Forces. (2nd. ed.) Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  7. Rosen, M.J. (1989) Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena. (2nd. ed.) John Wiley & Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  8. Miller, C.A.; Niyogi, P. (1985) Interfacial Phenomena. Equilibrium and Dynamic Effects. Marcel and Dekker, New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer London 2008

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