Abstract

This chapter presents the definitions, properties, preparation and uses of industrial gases. Several of the most important gases used in the chemical and metallurgical industry are treated individually and in detail. A table containing a comprehensive list of the properties of 70 industrial gases is also included.

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Further Reading

  1. Braker, W.; Mossman, A.L. (1980) Matheson Gas Data Book, 6th ed. Matheson Gas Products, Secaucus, NJ.Google Scholar
  2. Claude, G. (1926) Air liquide, oxygène, azote eet gaz rares., 2nd. ed. Dunod, Paris.Google Scholar
  3. Cobine, J.D. (1958) Gaseous Conductors. Dover, New York.Google Scholar
  4. Dymond, J.H.; Smith, E.B. (1980) The Virial Coefficients of Pure Gases and Mixtures, A Critical Compilation. Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Isaacs, N.S. (1981) Liquid Phase High Pressure Chemistry. John Wiley, New York.Google Scholar
  6. L’Air Liquide (1976) Encyclopédie des gaz. Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherland.Google Scholar
  7. Platzer, B.; Polt, A.; Mauer, G. (1990) Thermophysical properties of Refrigerants. Springer, Berlin.Google Scholar
  8. Reid, R.C.; Prausnitz, J.M.; Poling, B.E. (1987) The Properties of Gases and Liquids, 4th. Ed. McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
  9. Schmidt, E.; Grigull, U. (1982) Properties of Water and Steam in SI Units: 0–800°C and 0–1000 bar Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg.Google Scholar
  10. U.S. Bureau of Mines (1965) Flammability Characteristics of Combustible Gases and Vapors. USBM Bulletin No. 627, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington DC.Google Scholar
  11. Vargaftik, N.B. (1975) Tables of Thermophysical Properties of Liquids and Gases, 2nd. John Wiley, New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer London 2008

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