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Clinical Evaluation of the Pelvic Floor Muscles

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Pelvic Floor Re-education

Abstract

Clinical examination is the basis of diagnosis of urogynecological disorders. It is important that this examination is performed by a well-trained person with the appropriate skills. The patient should actively participate in the examination and be able to carry out pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contractions in a coordinated way when required. This will form the basis of subsequent pelvic floor exercises and is how the woman will learn the different types of muscle contraction which are integral to this. Digital self examination is an important part of pelvic floor re-education, and a woman should be able to do this herself. There are various grading methods, and, in particular, the P.E.R.F.E.C.T. scheme is an important assessment technique, and necessary when planning a treatment program. The Knack is a useful maneuver that can be taught to guard against stress incontinence.

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Newman, D.K., Laycock, J. (2008). Clinical Evaluation of the Pelvic Floor Muscles. In: Baessler, K., Burgio, K.L., Norton, P.A., Schüssler, B., Moore, K.H., Stanton, S.L. (eds) Pelvic Floor Re-education. Springer, London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84628-505-9_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84628-505-9_9

  • Publisher Name: Springer, London

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-85233-968-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-84628-505-9

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