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Nutrition of Infants and HIV

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Part of the Nutrition and Health book series (NH)

Abstract

Since 1985, it has been known that HIV can be transmitted through breast milk [1]. Infants who are infected with HIV are at a high risk of early death and carry a heavy burden of disease [2–4]. If no actions are taken, around one third of the children will be infected during pregnancy (5–10 %), delivery (10–20 %), or breastfeeding (10–20 %) [5].

Keywords

  • Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
  • Breast Feeding
  • Infant Formula
  • HIV/HIV Infections
  • Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy/HAART
  • Health Planning Guidelines

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The AFASS criteria are meant to guide health workers in assisting women to make infant feeding choices that are appropriate to their individual circumstances. The translation of this recommendation into operational settings is a challenge for health workers and counsellors as there is little guidance on what the terms “acceptable,” “sustainable,” “safe,” and “feasible” mean in practice.

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Correspondence to Lars T. Fadnes M.D., Ph.D., D.T.M.&H. .

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Fadnes, L.T., Doherty, T., Jackson, D., Engebretsen, I.M.S., Goga, A. (2013). Nutrition of Infants and HIV. In: Watson, R., Grimble, G., Preedy, V., Zibadi, S. (eds) Nutrition in Infancy. Nutrition and Health. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-254-4_14

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