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Review on the Use of Aloe vera (Aloe) in Dermatology

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Bioactive Dietary Factors and Plant Extracts in Dermatology

Abstract

Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. Aloe barbadensis Miller (Fig. 13.1), family Asphodelaceae, is a important medicinal plant and history suggest that it was used by the natives of ancient Greece, Rome, Babylonia, Arabian countries, Egypt, India, and China. The plant is supposed to be native of North Africa and Spain; however, today the plants are found growing also in Mexico, the Pacific Rim countries, India, South America, Central America, the Caribbean, Australia, and Africa [1–3]. A. vera plants are shrubby or arborescent, perennial, and pea-green in color. They are extremely sensitive to freezing temperatures but grow profusely in the warm tropical areas as the leaves have water storage tissue and this helps them survive in dry areas where rainfall is minimal or erratic [1]. Historical observations indicate that the name Aloe vera, or true Aloe, is probably derived from the Arabic word “alloeh,” Syrian “alwai,” or Hebrew “halal” meaning a “shining bitter substance.” It is commonly called aloe, burn plant, lily of the desert, elephant’s gall [1>–3]. The terminologies in various other languages are enlisted in Table 13.1.

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Correspondence to Manjeshwar Shrinath Baliga .

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Haniadka, R. et al. (2013). Review on the Use of Aloe vera (Aloe) in Dermatology. In: Watson, R., Zibadi, S. (eds) Bioactive Dietary Factors and Plant Extracts in Dermatology. Nutrition and Health. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-167-7_13

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-167-7_13

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