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Female Urinary Incontinence

  • Christopher K. PayneEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Current Clinical Urology book series (CCU)

Abstract

Urinary incontinence (UI) has long been recognized as a prevalent and morbid, but treatable problem for women of all ages. Despite this, only a minority of those affected seek care and many of those do not receive effective therapy. It is imperative that primary care providers work with urologists and gynecologists to identify women with UI and provide efficient evaluation and appropriate treatment.

This chapter provides an overview of the epidemiology and risk factors for UI. A practical approach to evaluation is offered with a goal of producing a working diagnosis of stress, urge, or mixed incontinence. With the diagnosis and a knowledge of the patient’s goals the clinician can initiate therapy in the majority of cases. In the treatment section there is an emphasis on evidence-based, nonsurgical, non-pharmacologic therapy although these modalities are fully reviewed. The indications for referral, types of testing provided by incontinence specialists, and newer advanced treatment options such as neuromodulation and botulinum toxin bladder injections are also presented.

Keywords

Urinary Incontinence Pelvic Floor Stress Urinary Incontinence Pelvic Organ Prolapse Pelvic Floor Muscle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of UrologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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