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Hypertension

  • Steven HollenbergEmail author
  • Stephen Heitner
Chapter
Part of the Current Clinical Practice book series (CCP, volume 1)

Abstract

Hypertension is highly prevalent in the United States and worldwide, and it is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, renal disease, and cardiovascular events [1]. The prevalence of hypertension increases with age. The Framingham Heart Study reported a 90% lifetime risk for developing hypertension in patients who are normotensive at the age of 50 [2]. The risk of cardiovascular disease doubles with each increment of 20/10 mmHg above 115/75 [3]. Systolic hypertension is now considered a more important risk factor than diastolic pressure [4, 5].

Keywords

Beta Blocker Systolic Hypertension Goal Blood Pressure Dihydropyridine Calcium Channel Blocker Compelling Indication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cooper University HospitalCamdenUSA
  2. 2.Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of Section of Cardiology Cooper University HospitalCamdenUSA

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