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Psychotherapy Increases the Amount of Serotonin Receptors in the Brains of Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

Part of the Current Clinical Psychiatry book series (CCPSY)

Abstract

The effects of psychotherapy have traditionally been measured by change in core symptoms, psychological abilities (personality, defenses, cognitions, etc.), or social functioning. With the advent of functional brain imaging methods (such as SPECT, PET, fMRI, and MEG), it has become possible to include a new dimension in the measurements, namely changes in brain functions after psychotherapy. Several studies investigating change in cerebral blood flow or metabolism have been published, and they have showed that different forms of psychotherapy indeed lead to brain changes [1, 2]. These studies have been usually performed with patients suffering from depressive or anxiety disorders, and the treatments have in the majority of the studies been cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT).

Keywords

  • Fluoxetine
  • major depressive disorder
  • positron emission tomography
  • serotonin receptors
  • short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy

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Fig. 13.1
Fig. 13.2

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Correspondence to Hasse Karlsson M.A., M.D., Ph.D. .

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Karlsson, H. (2012). Psychotherapy Increases the Amount of Serotonin Receptors in the Brains of Patients with Major Depressive Disorder. In: Levy, R., Ablon, J., Kächele, H. (eds) Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Research. Current Clinical Psychiatry. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60761-792-1_13

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60761-792-1_13

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