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Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Fragrances

  • Sarah J. GilpinEmail author
  • Howard I. Maibach
Chapter

Abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a specific type of contact dermatitis that develops after more than one skin contact with an allergenic chemical. Such contact results in an inflammatory skin response that manifests as a redness, edema, and sometimes skin lesions (Zhai and Maibach, Dermatotoxicology, 2004). ACD to fragrances is alleged to be a common cause of contact allergy to cosmetic products. It has been estimated that approximately 1% of the unselected population is allergic to fragrance materials (Frosch et al., Contact Derm 33:333–342, 1995). Since fragrance are no longer used only in fine perfumes and colognes, but also in popular, daily use products such as skin and hair care products, deodorants, and household products, identifying the causative agent can be problematic. Here we present three interesting clinical cases of contact allergy to fragrances and/or fragranced products, which demonstrate the complexity and breadth of the syndrome.

Keywords

Allergic contact dermatitis Fragrance allergy Contact allergy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of MinnesotaBlaineUSA

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