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Urticaria

  • Lloyd J. CleaverEmail author
  • Jonathan L. Cleaver
Chapter

Abstract

Urticaria is a common problem that can be a challenge not only for the patient, but also for a physician. Urticaria is classified based on clinical presentation and stimulus. The correct identification of the urticaria subtype is crucial for the management and treatment of the patient. A thorough history and physical examination are imperative in working up this diagnostic conundrum.

Keywords

Acute urticaria Chronic urticaria Physical urticaria Cholinergic urticaria Angioedema Urticaria and angioedema diagnosis and treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of DermatologyA.T. Still University/Northeast Regional Medical CenterKirksvilleUSA

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