New Perspectives on Chemotherapy in Prostate Cancer

  • Julia H. Hayes
  • Philip Kantoff
Part of the Current Clinical Oncology book series (CCO)

Keywords

Prostate Cancer Clin Oncol Androgen Deprivation Therapy Advanced Prostate Cancer Hormone Refractory Prostate Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia H. Hayes
  • Philip Kantoff

There are no affiliations available

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