Animal Glue Production from Skin Wastes

  • Azni Idris
  • Katayon Saed
  • Yung-Tse Hung
Chapter
Part of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering book series (HEE, volume 11)

Abstract

Animal glue is the most important protein adhesive obtained from animal hides, skins, and bones through hydrolysis of the collagen. Animal glue production has long been a lucrative business in various parts of the world. This chapter discusses pretreatment and conditioning techniques including acidic, alkali, and enzymic proteolysis, which are involved during animal glue production. The extraction methods, including denaturation and thermal treatment, are also discussed. The possible improvement of pot life and moisture resistance of animal glue using chemical modification technique is presented. The application of micro-bubble technique for glue production from cow skin is also introduced.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Azni Idris
    • 1
  • Katayon Saed
    • 2
  • Yung-Tse Hung
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Chemical and Environmental EngineeringUniversiti Putra MalaysiaSelangorMalaysia
  2. 2.Department of Civil EngineeringUniversiti Putra MalaysiaSelangorMalaysia
  3. 3.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringCleveland State UniversityClevelandUSA

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