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The Aging of the Human Lens

  • Jorge L. Aliò
  • Alfonso Anania
  • Paolo Sagnelli
Part of the Aging Medicine book series (AGME)

Abstract

Age-related lens changes include: a) the progressive increase in lens mass with age, b) changes in the point of insertion of the lens zonules, and c) a shortening of the radius of curvature of the anterior surface of the lens. With age, there is also decreased light transmission by the lens associated with increased light scatter, increased spectral absorption—particularly at the blue end of the spectrum—and increased lens fluorescence. Besides these physiological modifications, we must take into consideration the additional effects caused by exposure to external physical and chemical agents such as ultraviolet rays and drugs, which lead to considerable densitometric changes and consequently to modifications in optical lens quality. At present, new instruments allow the analysis, in clinical practice, of qualitative and quantitative alterations of the lens that occur with aging, confirming objectively the degradation of the optical quality of the crystalline lens.

Keywords

crystalline Lens age related changes human eye cataract. 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press, a part of Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorge L. Aliò
    • 1
  • Alfonso Anania
    • 2
  • Paolo Sagnelli
    • 3
  1. 1.Professor and Chairman of OphthalmologyUniversity “Miguel Hernandez” of HelceAlicanteSSpain
  2. 2.Diagnostic Centre of OphthalmicMicro-surgeryRomeItaly
  3. 3.European Ophthalmic Neuroscience Program (Local Research Unit), University of RomeLa SapienzaRomeItaly

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