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Positive Airway Pressure Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

  • Neil S. Freedman
Part of the Current Clinical Practice book series (CCP)

Abstract

Continuous positive airway therapy (CPAP) remains the mainstay of therapy for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). CPAP therapy has been demonstrated to resolve sleep-disordered breathing events and improve several clinical outcomes. The first part of this review will concentrate on conventional fixed-pressure CPAP therapy with the second portion of this chapter focussing on newer technological advancements in the delivery of positive pressure therapy.

Keywords

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neil S. Freedman
    • 1
  1. 1.The Sleep and Behavioral Medicine Institute, Bannockburn, IL and The Sleep CenterLake Forest HospitalLake Forest

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