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Adjunctive Hypnotic Management of Acute Pain in Invasive Medical Interventions

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Part of the Contemporary Pain Medicine book series (CPM)

Summary

Acute pain management remains a challenge to clinicians. Despite the advances in procedural techniques and pharmacologic treatment for patients, the use of narcotics and sedatives for clinical pain has considerable health system implications. An approach that safely provides comfort to patients while remaining cost-effective is highly desirable. Hypnosis as an alternative or adjunct to pharmacological management of acute pain has the potential to fulfill these requirements. This chapter presents the evidence for, and explores mechanisms of the benefits of, clinical hypnosis in acute pain management and presents a model of implementation in the modern medical environment.

Key Words

  • hypnosis
  • acute pain
  • medical procedures
  • surgery
  • pain management
  • hypnotic analgesia
  • anesthesia
  • conscious sedation

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Salazar, G.M.M., Faintuch, S., Lang, E.V. (2008). Adjunctive Hypnotic Management of Acute Pain in Invasive Medical Interventions. In: Audette, J.F., Bailey, A. (eds) Integrative Pain Medicine. Contemporary Pain Medicine. Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-344-8_10

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-344-8_10

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