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Irradiation

  • Lawrence K. Wang
  • J. Paul Chen
  • Robert C. Ziegler
Part of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering book series (HEE, volume 5)

Abstract

Solid substances described in this chapter will include foods, wastewater sludges, and solid wastes. Disinfection is a process involving the destruction or inactivation of pathogenic organisms in the solid substances. The process is carried out principally to ensure sanitation or to minimize public health concerns. Destruction is the physical disruption or disintegration of a pathogenic organism, although inactivation, as used here, is the removal of a pathogen’s ability to infect. An important but secondary concern may be to minimize the exposure of domestic animals to pathogens in the solid substances. At present in the United States, the use of procedures to reduce the number of pathogenic organisms is a requirement before sale of sludges or recycled byproducts to the public as a soil amendment, or before recycling the sludges/byproducts directly to croplands, forests, or parks. Because the final use or disposal of sludges/byproducts may differ greatly with respect to public health concerns, and because a great number of treatment options affecting various degrees of pathogen reduction are available, the system chosen for reduction of pathogens should be tailored to the demands of the particular situation (1,2).

Keywords

Sewage Sludge Fecal Coliform Electron Irradiation Pathogenic Organism Sludge Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence K. Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. Paul Chen
    • 4
  • Robert C. Ziegler
    • 5
  1. 1.Lenox Institute of Water TechnologyLenox
  2. 2.Krofta Engineering CorporationLenox
  3. 3.Zorex CorporationNewtonville
  4. 4.Division of Environmental Science and EngineeringNational University of SingaporeSingapore
  5. 5.Environmental Systems SectionArvin-Calspan, Inc.Buffalo

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