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What Is Criminal Profiling?

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Criminal Profiling

Abstract

Within the context of this book, the concept of criminal profiling is defined and described as a technique whereby the probable characteristics of a criminal offender or offenders are predicted based on the behaviors exhibited in the commission of a crime. A brief overview of the historical antecedents and development of criminal profiling is also presented and illustrates that criminal profiling is conceptually old and indicative of the human race’s long-held fascination with the assessment and prediction of criminality. This chapter concludes by outlining some of the common applications and objectives of criminal profiles.

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© 2006 Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ

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(2006). What Is Criminal Profiling?. In: Criminal Profiling. Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-109-3_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-109-3_1

  • Publisher Name: Humana Press

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-58829-639-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-59745-109-3

  • eBook Packages: MedicineMedicine (R0)

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