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Efavirenz

  • Graeme J. Moyle
  • Brian Conway
Part of the Infectious Disease book series (ID)

Abstract

The virological goal of therapy in the era of highly active antiviral therapy (HAART) is to achieve both substantial and sustained suppression of viral replication in all cellular and body compartments (1, 2). This response seems to be associated with at least partial immune reconstitution and a marked reduction in the risk of clinical events or death. Additionally, reducing the rate of viral replication to very low levels also seems to delay the emergence of drug-resistant viruses, one of the principal reasons for therapeutic failure (3)

Keywords

Viral Load AIDS Clinical Trial Group NNRTI Resistance Mutation Ical Failure Ificant Difference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graeme J. Moyle
    • 1
  • Brian Conway
    • 2
  1. 1.Chelsea and Westminster HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacology and TherapeuticsUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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