Powdered Activated Carbon Adsorption

  • Yung-Tse Hung
  • Howard H. Lo
  • Lawrence K. Wang
  • Jerry R. Taricska
  • Kathleen Hung Li
Part of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering book series (HEE, volume 4)

Abstract

Historically, the use of activated carbon has been limited to treatment applications for drinking water. In the past two decades, more attention has been given to the potential use of activated carbons for wastewater treatment. The interest in such a process has stemmed from the growing concern over the quality of rain water from which we get our potable water. Concern exists for the protection of both surface and groundwater supplies throughout the nation. In 1974, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) identified a total of 154 organic compounds in drinking waters1

Keywords

Solid Retention Time Powdered Activate Carbon Adsorption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yung-Tse Hung
  • Howard H. Lo
  • Lawrence K. Wang
  • Jerry R. Taricska
  • Kathleen Hung Li

There are no affiliations available

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