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Water Chlorination and Chloramination

  • Lawrence K. Wang
Part of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering book series (HEE, volume 4)

Abstract

Many chemicals function as both oxidizing agents (i.e., oxidants) and disinfecting agents (i.e., disinfectants); therefore, both oxidizing and disinfecting properties must be considered when selecting a chemical. The important characteristics of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, ozone, and UV radiation are described in many chapters of this handbook series(1-3). This chapter places emphasis on chlorination and chlo-ramination of potable water.Chlorination and chloramination of wastewater,sludge, and septage are also important (1-10),but will be introduced in separated chapters of this handbook series.

Keywords

Free Chlorine Chlorine Dioxide Chlorine Demand Chlorine Contact Time Secondary Disinfectant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence K. Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Lenox Institute of Water TechnologyLenox

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